Practical Agile

Most Agile training programs are two day crash courses. They emphasize the process and methodology per role. Unfortunately, this provides great theory with little practical information. VantageLinks’ Agile training course works across all team functions using a “learn than do” approach. Team members learn the why and the how. Then they practice using real world examples from their projects. From there, VantageLinks concentrates on team roles for specific additional guidance relevant to that job function.
Part of a successful Agile transformation is controlling which projects are being worked. This includes developing the ROI and LOE prior to the estimated backlog and average velocity. Scrum is used for large scale projects while Kanban is used for smaller projects or operational teams.
Some (but not all) of the topics covered:

  • Managing a portfolio of Agile projects
  • Resource assignment
  • Determining the Agile approach… Scrum versus Kanban
  • Measuring success
Training starts by working with the Agile project team. The training emphasis working together to build a shared language with an emphasis on “Succeed as a Team, Fail as a Team”.
Some (but not all) of the items included:

  • Agile philosophies and guiding principles
  • Team roles and self organizing teams
  • Agile planning
  • Customer Personas
  • Reducing Waste, Rolling Grooming, Readying
  • Limiting WIP (Work in Progress)
  • The Sacred Sprint
  • Sprint Cadence
  • Epics / Features / Stories
  • Minimal Marketable Feature & Minimal Viable Product
  • The Vertical Slice
  • User Stories & Acceptance Criteria
  • Relative Estimation
  • Daily Stand Up
  • Commitment to Quality
  • Release Planning
  • Demos
  • Retros
Transforming a QA department to a QE department requires a strong focus on elevating the skill set of the QA team. It requires a commitment to quality going beyond testing to break. Instead, we want to train the team to engineer quality into the product from the outset.
Some (but not all) of the items included:

  • Performing Exploratory Testing
  • Performing “Ility” testing (usability, scalability, etc)
  • Writing Test Automation
  • Writing effective Acceptance Criteria and Test Scenarios
  • Working in Gherkin
  • Designing for Testability
BAs work closely with the PO. The training will overlap, but also requires additional specific items.
Some (but not all) of the items included:

  • Working with Product Owners
  • Prioritizing the Backlog
  • Writing effective User Stories
  • Writing effective Acceptance Criteria
  • Working in Gherkin
  • Performing Exploratory Testing
  • Organizing the Deployment
Too often, we assume people who can program are developers. The training received in college doesn’t prepare us for writing excellent code instead of mediocre code.
Some (but not all) of the items included:

  • Using Sonar to write better code
  • Coding best practices
  • Reducing cyclomatic code complexity
  • Writing effective Unit Tests
  • Writing for backwards compatibility
  • Working in the main code line to avoid branching
  • Writing testable code
Transforming a QA department to a QE department requires a strong focus on elevating the skill set of the QA team. It requires a commitment to quality going beyond testing to break. Instead, we want to train the team to engineer quality into the product from the outset.
Some (but not all) of the items included:

  • Performing Exploratory Testing
  • Performing “Ility” testing (usability, scalability, etc)
  • Writing Test Automation
  • Writing effective Acceptance Criteria and Test Scenarios
  • Working in Gherkin
  • Designing for Testability
For more information on how our training solutions can help ensure success on your organization's next large training initiative, please contact us today: (866) 215-4607

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